Diana R. Samek, Ph.D.


Diana R. Samek, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2012
(334) 844-3173 | 203 Spidle Hall
drs0032@auburn.edu

Courses Taught:

Undergraduate
HDFS 3030: Adolescent Development in the Family
- The purpose of this course is to increase students’ awareness and understanding of adolescent and young adult development. Specifically, we will evaluate normative biological, psychological, and social changes that occur during adolescence and the transition to early adulthood. We will account for context (e.g., family, peer, school, culture) and study the development of cognition, identity, gender, and sexuality, as well as more problematic behaviors, such as substance use, delinquency, and depression. We will cover a number of different theories, including Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theories, family systems theory, and the developmental psychopathology approach. Research methods will also be reviewed and incorporated into the material, with special attention to distinguishing correlation from causation, the importance of longitudinal research studies, as well as the utility of other research designs used to tease apart cause and effect (e.g., twin and adoption studies, experimental designs with treatment and control groups). Students will also critique primary source research articles on a topic of their choosing and complete a literature review paper by course completion.
Prerequisites: HDFS 2010: Lifespan Human Development in Family Context; 2.25 GPA.

HDFS 3980: Undergraduate Research and Study
- You will be serving as an Undergraduate Research Assistant for the College Experiences Study Research Laboratory. The overall goal of this supervised experience is for you to gain experience working in a research lab as a part of a team. It is expected that you complete tasks as assigned and have regular attendance to lab meetings. By the end of this course, you are expected to 1) Develop an appreciation for ethics in research (e.g., confidentiality, protection of research subjects, the role of the Institutional Review Board/IRB), 2) Demonstrate competency in basic research, including aspects of data collection (e.g., location, recruitment, online survey tracking, compensation for completing online survey), 3) Have read, summarized, and discussed theoretical and basic research findings related to ongoing research in the lab.

Graduate
HDFS 7010: Child and Adolescent Development in Context
- HDFS 7010 is intended to give you an overview of current research and issues relevant to child and adolescent development. You will read and critique primary source materials, complete several formal and informal writing assignments, and engage in scholarly discussion and debate. I hope you will become excited about studying children and adolescents, learn to think critically about research evidence, and be able to apply research findings to solving practical problems.

HDFS 7990: Research and Thesis/Directed Study - Mentored graduate student Master’s thesis writing
- Students prepare agenda for weekly meetings breaking down larger goals (e.g., passing Master’s thesis, supervising Undergraduate Research Assistants) to yearly, monthly, weekly, and sometimes daily goals, then report on those goals at our weekly or bi-monthly meetings

HDFS 8990: Research and Dissertation
- Mentored graduate student qualifying exam and dissertation writing
- Students prepare agenda for weekly meetings breaking down larger goals (e.g., passing qualifying exam) to yearly, monthly, weekly, and sometimes daily goals, then report on those goals at our weekly or bi-monthly meetings